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Join me in my daily walk through the joys and struggles of parenthood. Share a word of encouragement or be encouraged. Cry a little, laugh a lot, but know it is all in divine order.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Feel Good Friday – Women’s History Month, 4 ways to celebrate

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Did you know that March is celebrated as Women’s History Month? This is a great time to explore your family’s history. What are some of the stories you have heard about the women in your family? Include your children as you celebrate Women’s History Month.

Below are four ways your child can celebrate:

1.      Have your child interview a woman in their life.
2.      Your child can write a letter to a woman they admire.
3.      Your child can a read a book about a woman who made contribution to our world   or perhaps who was  a local hero (shero).
4.      If you have young children, read books to them about women who made contributions to our society.

How about a round of Women’s History trivia? See if you can identify what the following notable women were/are famous for.

1.      Ella Fitzgerald
2.      Jackie Joyner-Keree
3.      Rosa Parks
4.      Mae C. Jemison
5.      Mya Angelo
6.      Emily Dickenson
7.      Oprah Winfrey

Before you peak at the answers below, here’s one more way you can celebrate Women’s History Month…read books by local authors. I have been fortunate to meet many great children’s book authors and participated in workshops, conferences and other gatherings with them.

It was recently announced that our very own Michigan author, Lisa Wheeler, has received the Golden Kite Award. Pick up a stack of her books at your local library or book store. Read to your child or enjoy them yourself. Have you met any local authors in your area?






Now for the answers to the Trivia questions. Check below to you did.

Answers
1.      One of the greatest jazz singers, lived 1918-1996
2.      First American woman to win Olympic Gold in the long jump (won in 1988 & 1992)
3.      Refused to give up her seat to a white person on a crowded bus during bus segregation time
4.      First African American woman to travel in space
5.      Poet
6.      Poet who wrote close 2000 poems


How will you celebrate Women’s History Month?

Monday, March 20, 2017

Muffins with Mom – The dome and other teen colloquialisms

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My teen son was excited to share with me a poem he created. The words slid from his mouth with rhythm. They bounced like the jab, jab, punch pattern of a boxer. And when the last phrase was delivered, he smiled and said, “That was off dome.”

Dome. My son was not referring to a covered shelter where indoor sports take place. Nor was he referring to the ceiling light in our car. For this teenager, off the dome, meant, off the top of his head.

On another occasion, I asked my son if the outfit I was wearing looked okay. He said, “It’s smooth.” Smooth. My son was not referring to the feel of a stone found lying on the ground. In the context of my son’s sentence, smooth, meant something looked nice or was cool.”

In a conversation with my son, I learned that teens are always on “the gram.” Could this be in relationship to a telegram? Maybe. The gram is a way to deliver a message, however, the reference is to Instagram. Teens use this social media to instantly deliver pictures and videos.

Teens seem to have a language of their own and they understand each other. Quite often when in a conversation with my teen son, he will stop mid-sentence and ask, “Do you know what that means?” Most of the time I am able to provide the correct meaning.


Do you speak the language of teen? What words have you heard a teen use that required you to draw conclusions about the meaning?

Friday, March 10, 2017

Fun Friday – Being Recruited


The military recruits people, athletes are recruited, so why not other entities? My son is at the finish line of his final year of high school as a student athlete. He has been considering what college to attend and play football.

My son has a consistent workout routine, he’s playing on a 7 on 7 football and he keeps his Hudl account (football highlights) updated. He is not new to the recruitment process. I, on the other hand, have just come to the realization that I have experienced recruitment on another level.

http://www.hudl.com/v/1Qyp5A Hudl Highlights (not of me).

Some forms of college recruitment involve an invite. The student is invited for a visit, to see what the particular college is like. I was invited as a part of the recruitment process. My invite came in the mail…it was from AARP (American Association of Retired Persons). It arrived when I was a mere 45 years old.

AARP invited me to become a member. If I were to send in my response by a certain date I could have received a free tote bag. It’s been six years since that initial invite, I have not joined yet, but the invitation still stands. I just may accept the next offer (now that I’m of age…in my mind). Some of the benefits/offers seem worthwhile.


Have you ever been recruited for anything?

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Wordless Wednesday - March is Reading Month


Do you need an excuse to avoid housework and read a book? Celebrate March is Reading Month, take time to pick up a book you've always wanted to read, put your feet up and relax. Encourage a child to read for the pure pleasure.

Monday, March 6, 2017

Bubble Blizzard

This is a short story/poem created for the 50 Precious Words Writing Challenge at Vivian Kirkfield's Blog. www.viviankirkfield.com. Thanks Vivian for sponsoring this challenge.


Flubble, bubble gas and air,
Sparkle foam lands here and there.
Crazy bubbles, blow through straws,
Pop a bubble, use your claws.
Bubbles swirl, bubbles twirl,
Streams of bubbles begin to hurl.
Bubble blizzard starts to land
Floating quietly onto a hand.
Flubble bubble gone astray,
Just until another day.


Muffins with Mom – Leftovers

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My teen son called me on the phone at the end of my work day. “Ma, what time are you coming home? I want tacos for dinner.”

“I should be there by 4:30pm, I’m finishing up a few things. Go ahead and start the tacos,” I said.
“No, I’ll wait for you.”

He waited, and waited and waited.

When I arrive home an hour later, my son was stretched across his bed asleep.
He mumbled a few muffled words to me, “what took you so long?”

“Umm, I had to wooork.”

“Now, I don’t have time to eat. I have practice tonight.”

I had already started making the tacos as soon as I entered the house. It was simple enough that my son could have prepared the meal himself, but he opted to wait for me. So, wait he did.

Our back and forth banter continued.

“The tacos are almost done, you can eat a couple before practice. Then eat more after practice,” I said.

“I don’t want to eat them after practice, they’ll be leftovers. You know I don’t like leftovers.”
“I won’t put the meat in the fridge. I’ll leave it at room temperature for you. You won’t be at practice that long.”

“It will be cold, I’ll have to warm everything up. It will be leftovers.”
In that debate discussion with my son, I walked away with a new definition of “leftovers”, from a teen’s perspective.


Do you have a finicky eater in your family?